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raresenses:

nappynomad:

socialjusticekoolaid:

The Ferguson City Council convened for the first time since Mike Brown’s death, and proved that they literally give no fucks about what the community has to say. Added to their vague, paltry proposed reforms, seems real change will have to come in Ferguson via the ballot box. I don’t care where you live folks— let this be a lesson in voting/participating in your local elections and government! #staywoke #farfromover 

My people getting it!

these people are the real heroes. not the military, not politicians, not the Hollywood actors. they risked their lives and livelihoods to challenge white supremacy and institutionalized racism.


reportagebygettyimages:

Photojournalist Ian Parry was only 24 years old when he was killed while covering the Romanian Revolution in 1989 for The Sunday Times of London. Aidan Sullivan, then the Times’ Director of Photography, created the Ian Parry Scholarship, which assists young photographers, from a determination ‘to create something positive from this tragedy.’ 

Now, 25 years after Parry’s death, the winners of the scholarship are being shown in a special exhibition at Visa pour l’Image in Perpignan, France. See more photos by the winners and read about Parry’s legacy on New York Times Lens Blog. 

Above photos by: Jonas Bendiksen, Marcus Bleasdale, Farzana Hossen

tripleacontent:

Newspaper headlines over the past month, chronicling Israel’s blood-soaked deception.

tripleacontent:

Newspaper headlines over the past month, chronicling Israel’s blood-soaked deception.


qawiya:

jackinaboxwithoutakeytolockit:

Some 500 people on Monday staged a silent protest in Tokyo against the bloodshed in Gaza, the biggest such gathering in the Japanese capital since the violence began early this month.

wow <3

The revolution that sprung from the primal, human desire to live, has taught us instead infinite wisdom about death. Death, in every form, has forever permeated us.

In several days, the Syrian revolution will enter its fourth year. Three years have passed since that promising spring of 2011. Three years after thousands of Syrians rose up to fight the Assad regime’s injustice and brutality with chants and flags. Their chants were met with bullets and mass arrests. Later their armed resistance would be met by barrel bombs and chemical-laden missiles. And as the crisis dragged on, foreign terrorists poured into the country to fight for an agenda that does not represent the Syrians’ early demands for freedom and dignity. Today, Syria as we once knew it, is gone: a third of the population is displaced, over a million homes have been destroyed, and over 100,000 people are dead. Spring is no longer a season to celebrate rebirth. It is a season to mourn the death of a country’s dream.

Over the past three years, the Syrian people’s struggle for self-determination has been called many names. But no matter the name, revolution, uprising, civil war, proxy war, complicated conflict, one fact is clear: the world has been watching genocide in slow motion.

I remember when the number of dead were in the twenties and thirties then slowly crept up to the sixties and eighties. The first day the number of dead hit 100 was a milestone that quickly became an everyday banality. In August 2012, a massacre in Daraya, the heart of the non-violent movement in Syria, took 500 lives. The world was shocked but not moved. On another August day, a year later, over 1400 people would be gassed to death. The world bristled but nothing changed.

It seems that no number of dead Syrians will tip the world’s conscience. Even the UN has stopped counting our dead, because it’s too dangerous, too difficult to verify. Most of us suspect another reason: no one cares.


--Lina Sergie Attar, Counting Syria’s Dead (via arabstateofmind)


My experiences at Princeton have made me far more aware of my “Blackness” than ever before. I have found that at Princeton no matter how liberal and open-minded some of my White professors and classmates try to be toward me, I sometimes feel like a visitor on campus; as if I really don’t belong. Regardless of the circumstances underwhich I interact with Whites at Princeton, it often seems as if, to them, I will always be Black first and a student second.

These experiences have made it apparent to me that the path I have chosen to follow by attending Princeton will likely lead to my further integration and/or assimilation into a White cultural and social structure that will only allow me to remain on the periphery of society; never becoming a full participant. This realization has presently made my goals to actively utilize my resources to benefit the Black community more desirable. [x]

excerpt from "Princeton-educated Blacks and the Black Community,”
A thesis presented to Princeton University by Michelle LaVaughn Robinson (Michelle Obama)

(Source: just-remember-darling)


Samantha Bee talks to Peter Schiff, financial commentator and CEO of Euro Pacific Capital Inc. 

(Source: sandandglass)

"Jamaica is a constitutional monarchy with The Queen as Sovereign.

As a constitutional monarch, The Queen abides by the decisions of the Jamaican Government, but she continues to play important ceremonial and symbolic roles.

In all her duties, The Queen acts as Queen of Jamaica, quite distinct from her role in the United Kingdom or any of her other realms.

Over the course of her reign, The Queen has visited Jamaica six times to date, touring the island extensively.

As a constitutional monarch, The Queen of Jamaica acts entirely on the advice of Jamaican Government ministers.

She is fully briefed by means of regular communications from her ministers, and has audiences with them where possible.

The Queen is represented on the island by a Governor-General.

Jamaica is one of a number of Commonwealth countries that have retained the UK Privy Council, of which The Queen is Head, as their court of final appeal.

The Queen’s Royal style and title is Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God of Jamaica and of Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth.”


(Source: sandandglass)

nezua:

mentalalchemy:

thepeoplesrecord:

The drone that killed my grandson by Nasser al-AwlakiJuly 20, 2013
I learned that my 16-year-old grandson, Abdulrahman — a United States citizen — had been killed by an American drone strike from news reports the morning after he died.
The missile killed him, his teenage cousin and at least five other civilians on Oct. 14, 2011, while the boys were eating dinner at an open-air restaurant in southern Yemen.
I visited the site later, once I was able to bear the pain of seeing where he sat in his final moments. Local residents told me his body was blown to pieces. They showed me the grave where they buried his remains. I stood over it, asking why my grandchild was dead.
Nearly two years later, I still have no answers. The United States government has refused to explain why Abdulrahman was killed. It was not until May of this year that the Obama administration, in a supposed effort to be more transparent, publicly acknowledged what the world already knew — that it was responsible for his death.
The attorney general, Eric H. Holder Jr., said only that Abdulrahman was not “specifically targeted,” raising more questions than he answered.
My grandson was killed by his own government. The Obama administration must answer for its actions and be held accountable. On Friday, I will petition a federal court in Washington to require the government to do just that.
Abdulrahman was born in Denver. He lived in America until he was 7, then came to live with me in Yemen. He was a typical teenager — he watched “The Simpsons,” listened to Snoop Dogg, read “Harry Potter” and had a Facebook page with many friends. He had a mop of curly hair, glasses like me and a wide, goofy smile.
In 2010, the Obama administration put Abdulrahman’s father, my son Anwar, on C.I.A. and Pentagon “kill lists” of suspected terrorists targeted for death. A drone took his life on Sept. 30, 2011.
The government repeatedly made accusations of terrorism against Anwar — who was also an American citizen — but never charged him with a crime. No court ever reviewed the government’s claims nor was any evidence of criminal wrongdoing ever presented to a court. He did not deserve to be deprived of his constitutional rights as an American citizen and killed.
Early one morning in September 2011, Abdulrahman set out from our home in Sana by himself. He went to look for his father, whom he hadn’t seen for years. He left a note for his mother explaining that he missed his father and wanted to find him, and asking her to forgive him for leaving without permission.
A couple of days after Abdulrahman left, we were relieved to receive word that he was safe and with cousins in southern Yemen, where our family is from. Days later, his father was targeted and killed by American drones in a northern province, hundreds of miles away. After Anwar died, Abdulrahman called us and said he was going to return home.
That was the last time I heard his voice. He was killed just two weeks after his father.
A country that believes it does not even need to answer for killing its own is not the America I once knew. From 1966 to 1977, I fulfilled a childhood dream and studied in the United States as a Fulbright scholar, earning my doctorate and then working as a researcher and assistant professor at universities in New Mexico, Nebraska and Minnesota.
I have fond memories of those years. When I first came to the United States as a student, my host family took me camping by the ocean and on road trips to places like Yosemite, Disneyland and New York — and it was wonderful.
After returning to Yemen, I used my American education and skills to help my country, serving as Yemen’s minister of agriculture and fisheries and establishing one of the country’s leading institutions of higher learning, Ibb University. Abdulrahman used to tell me he wanted to follow in my footsteps and go back to America to study. I can’t bear to think of those conversations now.
After Anwar was put on the government’s list, but before he was killed, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Center for Constitutional Rights represented me in a lawsuitchallenging the government’s claim that it could kill anyone it deemed an enemy of the state.
The court dismissed the case, saying that I did not have standing to sue on my son’s behalf and that the government’s targeted killing program was outside the court’s jurisdiction anyway.
After the deaths of Abdulrahman and Anwar, I filed another lawsuit, seeking answers and accountability. The government has argued once again that its targeted killing program is beyond the reach of the courts. I find it hard to believe that this can be legal in a constitutional democracy based on a system of checks and balances.
The government has killed a 16-year-old American boy. Shouldn’t it at least have to explain why?

Nasser al-Awlaki, the founder of Ibb University and former president of Sana University, served as Yemen’s minister of agriculture and fisheries from 1988 to 1990.
Source


End the drone strikes!

The USA, like its terror twin Israel, is killing itself…a slow death by a thousand surgical strikes to the moral center.

nezua:

mentalalchemy:

thepeoplesrecord:

The drone that killed my grandson by Nasser al-Awlaki
July 20, 2013

I learned that my 16-year-old grandson, Abdulrahman — a United States citizen — had been killed by an American drone strike from news reports the morning after he died.

The missile killed him, his teenage cousin and at least five other civilians on Oct. 14, 2011, while the boys were eating dinner at an open-air restaurant in southern Yemen.

I visited the site later, once I was able to bear the pain of seeing where he sat in his final moments. Local residents told me his body was blown to pieces. They showed me the grave where they buried his remains. I stood over it, asking why my grandchild was dead.

Nearly two years later, I still have no answers. The United States government has refused to explain why Abdulrahman was killed. It was not until May of this year that the Obama administration, in a supposed effort to be more transparent, publicly acknowledged what the world already knew — that it was responsible for his death.

The attorney general, Eric H. Holder Jr., said only that Abdulrahman was not “specifically targeted,” raising more questions than he answered.

My grandson was killed by his own government. The Obama administration must answer for its actions and be held accountable. On Friday, I will petition a federal court in Washington to require the government to do just that.

Abdulrahman was born in Denver. He lived in America until he was 7, then came to live with me in Yemen. He was a typical teenager — he watched “The Simpsons,” listened to Snoop Dogg, read “Harry Potter” and had a Facebook page with many friends. He had a mop of curly hair, glasses like me and a wide, goofy smile.

In 2010, the Obama administration put Abdulrahman’s father, my son Anwar, on C.I.A. and Pentagon “kill lists” of suspected terrorists targeted for death. A drone took his life on Sept. 30, 2011.

The government repeatedly made accusations of terrorism against Anwar — who was also an American citizen — but never charged him with a crime. No court ever reviewed the government’s claims nor was any evidence of criminal wrongdoing ever presented to a court. He did not deserve to be deprived of his constitutional rights as an American citizen and killed.

Early one morning in September 2011, Abdulrahman set out from our home in Sana by himself. He went to look for his father, whom he hadn’t seen for years. He left a note for his mother explaining that he missed his father and wanted to find him, and asking her to forgive him for leaving without permission.

A couple of days after Abdulrahman left, we were relieved to receive word that he was safe and with cousins in southern Yemen, where our family is from. Days later, his father was targeted and killed by American drones in a northern province, hundreds of miles away. After Anwar died, Abdulrahman called us and said he was going to return home.

That was the last time I heard his voice. He was killed just two weeks after his father.

A country that believes it does not even need to answer for killing its own is not the America I once knew. From 1966 to 1977, I fulfilled a childhood dream and studied in the United States as a Fulbright scholar, earning my doctorate and then working as a researcher and assistant professor at universities in New Mexico, Nebraska and Minnesota.

I have fond memories of those years. When I first came to the United States as a student, my host family took me camping by the ocean and on road trips to places like Yosemite, Disneyland and New York — and it was wonderful.

After returning to Yemen, I used my American education and skills to help my country, serving as Yemen’s minister of agriculture and fisheries and establishing one of the country’s leading institutions of higher learning, Ibb University. Abdulrahman used to tell me he wanted to follow in my footsteps and go back to America to study. I can’t bear to think of those conversations now.

After Anwar was put on the government’s list, but before he was killed, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Center for Constitutional Rights represented me in a lawsuitchallenging the government’s claim that it could kill anyone it deemed an enemy of the state.

The court dismissed the case, saying that I did not have standing to sue on my son’s behalf and that the government’s targeted killing program was outside the court’s jurisdiction anyway.

After the deaths of Abdulrahman and Anwar, I filed another lawsuit, seeking answers and accountability. The government has argued once again that its targeted killing program is beyond the reach of the courts. I find it hard to believe that this can be legal in a constitutional democracy based on a system of checks and balances.

The government has killed a 16-year-old American boy. Shouldn’t it at least have to explain why?

Nasser al-Awlaki, the founder of Ibb University and former president of Sana University, served as Yemen’s minister of agriculture and fisheries from 1988 to 1990.

Source

End the drone strikes!

The USA, like its terror twin Israel, is killing itself…a slow death by a thousand surgical strikes to the moral center.

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

zuky:

thesmithian:


…[some] may not remember what made Iran-Contra such an extraordinary scandal. The Reagan administration “raised money privately” by selling weapons to a sworn enemy of the United States. Why? Because it wanted to fund an illegal war in Nicaragua. And when I say “illegal war,” I mean that quite literally—Congress told the Reagan administration, in no uncertain terms, that Reagan could not send money to the Contras. Period. The Reagan administration, unrestrained by laws and the Constitution, did so anyway, and much of the president’s national security team ended up under indictment.

more.

Reagan knew everything. However, I bet this Time magazine piece doesn’t get into the juiciest part of Iran-Contra, which is that in the 1980s the CIA put into operation a crack cocaine pipeline to import narcotics from Central and South America and distribute it in US inner cities. This is not a “conspiracy theory”, this is a documented conspiracy, most rigorously researched and reported by Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Gary Webb, whose series in the San Jose Mercury News and subsequent book “Dark Alliance” literally got him killed. To me, that’s the story of Iran-Contra: not that Reagan sold weapons to Iran, but that the US government imported and sold crack to Black America, as part of an arms and drugs trade which funded war in the Third World and which devastated lives and filled prisons in the USA.

zuky:

thesmithian:

…[some] may not remember what made Iran-Contra such an extraordinary scandal. The Reagan administration “raised money privately” by selling weapons to a sworn enemy of the United States. Why? Because it wanted to fund an illegal war in Nicaragua. And when I say “illegal war,” I mean that quite literally—Congress told the Reagan administration, in no uncertain terms, that Reagan could not send money to the Contras. Period. The Reagan administration, unrestrained by laws and the Constitution, did so anyway, and much of the president’s national security team ended up under indictment.

more.

Reagan knew everything. However, I bet this Time magazine piece doesn’t get into the juiciest part of Iran-Contra, which is that in the 1980s the CIA put into operation a crack cocaine pipeline to import narcotics from Central and South America and distribute it in US inner cities. This is not a “conspiracy theory”, this is a documented conspiracy, most rigorously researched and reported by Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Gary Webb, whose series in the San Jose Mercury News and subsequent book “Dark Alliance” literally got him killed. To me, that’s the story of Iran-Contra: not that Reagan sold weapons to Iran, but that the US government imported and sold crack to Black America, as part of an arms and drugs trade which funded war in the Third World and which devastated lives and filled prisons in the USA.


This topic has been talked to death, but I want to add my two cents into this.

I recently had a conversation with my mother and her husband, who were not only against abortion, but contraception as well. Even in cases of rape, sexual assault, and the fetus dying in the womb, my mother’s husband believed that the fetus should be brought to term. Even if it meant the mother dying or suffering severe pain (physically, emotionally, mentally).

His excuse? The Bible says so.

Now, I don’t speak for all pro-choices, but I know that for me, being pro-choice doesn’t mean I’m pro-abortion. Being pro-choice doesn’t even mean being pro-sex. It means that the world isn’t black and white. It isn’t about being women being ‘whores’ and ‘sluts’, and now they ‘have to pay the price’. It’s about providing women, and men, with information and protection that stops them from getting pregnant in the first place. It’s about providing services for pregnant women, regardless of how they became pregnant, that helps them care for the child. You can’t, on one hand, say that all abortions should be illegal, and then on the other hand, cut funding to or eliminate programs that help women that don’t have the support they need economically. You can’t give a fetus rights from the second it’s conceived and take away the rights of their mothers. You can’t say that every child is important and then have schools have severe budget cuts. You want to protect the child? Protect the mother first and foremost. Help the mother first and foremost.

Hilary Clinton, regardless of whether or not you agree with her politics, provides good points in this video. 

(Source: )


Interesting. The USA and Israel tries to boss people around, they lose their vote. Wonder who’ll be getting bribed to get it back.


Jamaican. Theatre Artist. Reader. Lover of Elephants & Viggo Mortensen.